Urinary Tract Infection

Urinary Tract Infection

UTIs are a key reason we’re often told to wipe from front to back after using the bathroom. That’s because the urethra — the tube that transports urine from the bladder to the outside of the body — is located close to the anus. Bacteria from the large intestine, such as E. coli, are in the perfect position to escape the anus and invade the urethra. From there, they can travel up to the bladder, and if the infection isn’t treated, continue on to infect the kidneys. Women may be especially prone to UTIs because they have shorter urethras, which allow bacteria quick access to the bladder. Having sex can introduce bacteria into the urinary tract, too.

 

Symptoms of UTIs

  • • A burning feeling when you urinate
  • • A frequent or intense urge to urinate, even though little comes out when you do
  • • Pain or pressure in your back or lower abdomen
  • • Cloudy, dark, bloody, or strange-smelling urine
  • • Feeling tired or shaky
  • • Fever or chills (a sign the infection may have reached your kidneys

 

Tests and Treatments for UTIs

If you suspect you have a urinary tract infection, head to the doctor. You’ll be asked to give a urine sample, which will be tested for the presence of UTI-causing bacteria. The treatment? Antibiotics to kill the intruders. As always, be sure to finish off the prescribed cycle of medicine completely, even after you start to feel better. And drink lots of water to help flush the bacteria from your system.